Before 1850 Dulwich was a small village in the centre of a valley with large houses built mostly in the previous hundred years in the best positions on the slopes. The impetus for development in the mid-Victorian period came with the expansion of London, the building of the railways and the reform of the charity, Alleyn’s College of God’s Gift, which owned most of Dulwich. Edward Alleyn (1566-1626) was an early modern actor and playhouse owner.

He was Lord of the Manor of Dulwich from 1606 and founder of Dulwich schools, almshouses and chapel. Expensive detached villas were erected in the 1860s at the southern end of Dulwich, the residents sending their children to the newly rebuilt Dulwich College.

The population more than doubled from about 1,700 in 1861 to 4,000 ten years later. By 1920, Dulwich was transformed from a rural hamlet to a London suburb, with a population of probably around 12,000. The greatest period of building was between 1890 and 1910, when more semi-detached houses for the lower middle classes were put up around the boundaries of the estate. 

Between the wars there was little building apart from Roseway and two council estates in the northern part of Dulwich. After World War Two, however, demand for more housing and pressure from the local authorities led to the building of larger estates and more private housing. However, the population at the end of the 1960s would still have been less than 20,000.

ABBOTSWOOD ROAD, SE22
Named in 1995. The name was taken from a telephone directory.

ACACIA GROVE, SE21
Named in 1866. A supposedly Masonic association (suggested in 'Camberwell Place and Street Names and their Origin', Camberwell Borough Council, 1964) is rather tenuous, and there is no convincing explanation for the name, except as the epitome of suburbia.

ACRE DRIVE, SE22
Named in 1996 for a short close just off Crystal Palace Road,. The name was taken from a telephone directory.

ADYS ROAD, SE15
Named in 1878.  A Mr Adye or Adys was involved in at least one of Edward Alleyn’s legal cases.

ALBRIGHTON ROAD, SE22
Named in 1934 after the Albrighton Hunt in Staffordshire. One of a number of roads believed to have been named after hunts, in recognition of hunting in Dulwich. Other roads include Pytchley and Quorn Roads.

ALLEYN CRESCENT, SE21 
Named in 1961 for Edward Alleyn (1566-1626), early modern actor and playhouse owner. Lord of the manor of Dulwich from 1606 and founder of Dulwich schools, almshouses and chapel. 

ALLEYN PARK, SE21
Named in 1877 after Edward Alleyn (1566-1626), early modern actor and playhouse owner. Lord of the manor of Dulwich from 1606 and founder of Dulwich schools, almshouses and chapel.

ALLEYN ROAD, SE21
Named in 1895 after Edward Alleyn (1566-1626), early modern actor and playhouse owner. Lord of the manor of Dulwich from 1606 and founder of Dulwich schools, almshouses and chapel.

ALLISON GROVE, SE21
The house and estate later comprising Allison Grove was ancient copyhold. In 1795 it was conveyed to Caleb Marshall. After his daughter Allison Allen Marshall (later Mrs Castondeick) died in 1859, the property was enfranchised by her heir TW Parker, who in 1868 named the development Allison Grove, after his benefactress. 'Allison Towers' stood on the corner with Dulwich Common until the early 1960s. The house of the Joyce family (the most well-known, indeed notorious, member of which was William Joyce (1906-1946), alias 'Lord Haw-Haw', Nazi propagandist), in Allison Grove, was ironically the first in Dulwich to be bombed during the 1940 Blitz. 

ARCHDALE ROAD, SE22
Named in 1871 after a road in Fermanagh, Northern Ireland.

ARDBEG ROAD, SE24
Named in 1891 after a village in Argyll.

ARNHEM WAY, SE22
Named in 1967 after Arnhem in the Netherlands. One of the Dutch-derived names of developments on either side of East Dulwich Grove, named in honour of the 'friendship link' between the Metropolitan Borough of Camberwell and Deventer, in the Netherlands. The other roads in the development are Delft Way, Deventer Crescent, Hilversum Crescent, Isel Way, Kempis Way, Nimegen Way, Steen Way and Terborch Way.

ARNOULD AVENUE, SE5
Named in 1952 after Sir Joseph Arnould (1815-1886), a barrister, author and judge in India, born in Camberwell. One of a group of roads on the Champion Hill Estate, named after friends or connections of the Camberwell-born poet Robert Browning (1812-1889), although oddly not including one named after Browning himself. The others are Domett Close, Dowson Close, Moncler Close and Wanley Road./p>

ASHBOURNE GROVE, SE22
Named in 1873. Part of the ‘colony’ of roads in East Dulwich, built between 1873 and 1885 by Ezekiel James Bailey (1829-1899), a builder from Derbyshire. The other roads are Chesterfield, Derwent and Melbourne Groves and Colwell Road (qv). 

ATTLEBOROUGH COURT, SE21
Named in 1952 after John Attleborough (fl. 1399), Prior of Bermondsey Abbey in 1399 and made the first Abbot of the house at Bermondsey Abbey by Pope Boniface IX. One of three blocks of flats on the Sydenham Hill Estate named after abbots (or priors) of Bermondsey Abbey (or Priory), lord of the manor of Dulwich from 1127 to the Dissolution of the Monasteries in 1538. The others are Bromleigh Court and Dunton Court. 

AYSGARTH ROAD, SE21
Named in 1896 after a Yorkshire estate briefly owned by Edward Alleyn (1566-1626), early modern actor and playhouse owner. Lord of the manor of Dulwich from 1606 and founder of Dulwich schools, almshouses and chapel.

BAIRD GARDENS, SE21
Named in 1958, this was formerly the site of Thornhill House. John Logie Baird (1888-1946), the television pioneer, lived for a time at 3 Crescent Wood Road, and carried out many of his experiments at his laboratory at the Crystal Palace.

BALCHIER ROAD, SE22
Named in 1879. Believed to be after William Belchier (sic) (1715-1772) who inherited the estate of Walter Cock including 75 acres at Peckham Rye. Mr Belchier was a banker in Southwark and MP for Southwark from 1747 until bankruptcy in late 1760 meant he could not stand in the 1761 election. An alternative theory is that a Mrs Belchior owned the land at the time of development.

BARCLAY WAY, SE22
Named in 1985 to commemorate Robert Barclay Allardice (1779-1854), commonly known as Captain Barclay, who attended Dr Glennie’s Academy and was known for his walking feats which included walking one miles for each of 1,000 hours. One of the access roads on the development at the junction of Dulwich Common and Lordship Lane named for friends of Dr William Glennie (1761-1828) whose 18th century school was nearby. The others are Barker Way, Howard Way, Hunt Way, Moore Way and Wilkie Way.

BARKER WAY, SE22
Named in 1985 to commemorate Robert Barker (1739-1806), a painter of panoramas and friend of Dr Glennie. One of the access roads on the development at the junction of Dulwich Common and Lordship Lane named for friends of Dr William Glennie (1761-1828) whose 18th century school was nearby. The others are Barclay Way, Howard Way, Hunt Way, Moore Way and Wilkie Way.

BARRY ROAD, SE22
Named in 1867, commemorates Sir Charles Barry (1795-1860), architect of the Houses of Parliament and architect to the Dulwich Estate from 1830-58.

BASINGDON WAY, SE5
Named in 1949 after a prominent 16th century Camberwell family. One of a number of names eemingly picked at random from Blanch's 'Ye Parish of Camerwell' (1875), at a time of redevelopment when many 'new' names were needed.

BASSANO STREET, SE22
Named in 1895, possibly after the Venetian painters Jacopo and Francesco Bassano. Dulwich Picture Gallery has a set of paintings which are copied from originals made by them.

BAWDALE ROAD, SE22
Named in 1879, believed to be a misspelling derived from Boredale or Boardale in Cumbria.

BEAUVAL ROAD, SE22
Named in 1894 for the de Cherries (or Cherry) family of Camberwell, whose ancestors were lords of the manor of Beauval Liguiere in the early 17th century. The first of the family to settle in Camberwell was Sir Francis Cherry (1552-1605).

BEECHWOOD COURT, SE19
Between Fountain Drive and Crystal Palace Parade. Derivation unknown

BELL MEADOW, SE19
Named in 1969 after Bell Meadows, three fields (six acres in all, one of them called the Bell Field) at the back of 'The Bell' Inn in Dulwich Village, first mentioned in 1690, and on the site of the Old College entrance to Dulwich Park. No connection to Bell House in College Road.

BELVOIR ROAD, SE22
Named in 1869. Once thought to have been named after the Belvoir Hunt in Lincolnshire but more likely to be a French rendition of ‘beautiful view’.

BESANT PLACE, SE22
Built on the site of the old Grove Vale depot, it commemorates social reformer Annie Besant (1847-1933).

BEW COURT, SE22
Block of flats on the Lordship Lane estate at the junction of Dulwich Common and Lordship Lane and named in 1950. The present site of the Grove Tavern was known as Bew's Corner. Bew was a man 
employed at the College who opened a beerhouse there, using some of the outbuildings of Dr Glennie’s school which had also been on the site. His wife, known as Old Mother Bew, ran a teashop there in the 19th century. 

BLACKWATER STREET, SE22
Named in 1880 after Blackwater Cottage which was in turn named for the Blackwater stream which crossed what is now Townley Road and flowed down Lordship Lane. 

BLANCHEDOWNE, SE5 
Named in 1949 named for and built near a piece of land first mentioned in 1400. The Court Rolls refer to the flooded footpath to the church of St Giles, Camberwell between Myddelfeld & Blaunchysdoune in 1435. Blanchedowne also adjoined Addingtons Mead, and lay in north Dulwich. 

BOWEN DRIVE, SE21
Part of the Kingswood Estate and named in 1950. Charles Synge Christopher Bowen (1835-1894), later Baron Bowen of Hollymount, was appointed a Governor of Dulwich College in 1872. He became a Law Lord in 1893 and died the following year. 

BOWLEY CLOSE, SE19
One of four access roads on the site of Crystal Palace High Level Station. Derivations unknown. The others are Bowley Lane, Burntwood View and Spinney Gardens.

BOWLEY LANE, SE19
One of four access roads on the site of Crystal Palace High Level Station. Derivations unknown. The others are Bowley Close, Burntwood View and Spinney Gardens.

BOXALL ROAD, SE21
Formerly Boxall's Row. In about 1773 John Shaw (wheelwright) and William Levens (builder) built six brick houses at the eastern end (starting with a Wheelwright's shop) of what became Boxall Row, for Robert Boxall, lessee of The Greyhound Inn. The road was formally named in 1876 and gradually extended westward, to link up with Turney Road in the late 1870s. 

BREAKSPEARE, SE21
A development off College Road, just north of Sydenham Hill Station named in 1965, presumably after Nicholas Breakspear (c. 1115-1159), who as Adrian IV was the only English Pope, but who had no known connection with Dulwich. 

BROMLEIGH COURT, SE21
Named in 1952 after John Bromleigh (fl. 1432), abbot of Bermondsey from 1432 to 1473. One of three blocks of flats on the Sydenham Hill Estate named after abbots (or priors) of Bermondsey Abbey (or Priory), lord of the manor of Dulwich from 1127 to the Dissolution of the Monasteries in 1538. The others are Attleborough Court and Dunton Court.

BURBAGE ROAD, SE21
Named after Richard Burbage, the Elizabethan actor, and contemporary of Edward Alleyn, who died in 1619.

BURIAL GROUND, SE21
A triangular piece of land at the north end of what had been Carter's Garden, laid out for a burial ground by Edward Alleyn in 1616. It was enlarged twice before in 1858 it was closed in 1858, though several people had ancient rights to be buried there and the last person interred was in 1918.

BURNTWOOD VIEW, SE19
One of four access roads on the site of Crystal Palace High Level Station. Derivations unknown. The others are Bowley Close, Bowley Lane and Spinney Gardens.

BURROW ROAD, SE22
Named in 1995. The name was taken from a telephone directory.

BUXTED ROAD, SE22
Named in 1995. The name was taken from a telephone directory.

BYRON COURT, SE22
Block of flats on the Lordship Lane estate at the junction of Dulwich Common and Lordship Lane and named in 1950 after the poet Lord Byron (1788-1824), who attended a school on the site run by Dr William Glennie (1761-1828).

CALTON AVENUE, SE21
Calton Road until 1922. The Calton family were owners of Dulwich Manor between 1544 and 1606. Thomas Calton bought it from intermediaries of Henry VIII's, and his grandson Sir Francis Calton sold it to Edward Alleyn.

CAMPBELL COURT, SE22
Block of flats on the Lordship Lane estate at the junction of Dulwich Common and Lordship Lane and named in 1950 after the poet Thomas Campbell who lived in Sydenham and visited the school on the site run by Dr William Glennie (1761-1828).

CARVER ROAD, SE24
Named for Canon Alfred Carver, appointed Master of Dulwich College in 1858, who almost single-handedly transformed the College into one of the country's leading schools. Under him it moved, in 1871, from the old College in Dulwich Village to the present buildings in College Road.

CASINO AVENUE, SE24
Named after 'Casino' (also spelt 'Casina', or even 'Cassina'), the house built in 1800 by Richard Shawe, Warren Hastings' Counsel at his impeachment and trial from 1790 to 1797. The mansion. which was demolished in 1906, had a large estate attached, including the lake (now reduced in size) in Sunray Gardens.

CEDAR CLOSE, SE21
Off Thurlow Park Road. Derivation unknown.

CHAMPION HILL, SE5
Named after the 18th century Camberwell family of de Crespigny, of Huguenot origin, which included Sir Claude Champion de Crespigny, whose estate was nearby. In 1806 boundary stones (still in situ) were ordered to be placed near Champion Hill, to show which part of that road was College property. 

CHESTERFIELD GROVE, SE22
Named in 1879. Part of the ‘Derbyshire colony’ of roads in East Dulwich, built between 1873 and 1885 by Ezekiel James Bailey (1829-1899), a builder from Derbyshire. The other roads are Ashbourne, Derwent and Melbourne Groves and Colwell Road (qv).

CHURCH APPROACH, SE21
The connecting road between Alleyn Road and South Croxted Road, leading to Emmanuel Church.

CLEVE HALL ESTATE, SE5
The Cleve Hall Estate in north Dulwich takes its name from Cleve Hall (long since demolished) on Champion Hill, leased in 1807 to George Sharp, and in 1895 to Mrs SA Bennett.

COKERS LANE, SE21
Now the name given to part of the development on the west side of Croxted Road which includes Pymers Mead and Perifield, Cokers was originally a collection of several fields, about 46 acres in all, occupying the sites of the various Sports Grounds on the south side of Dulwich Common. The original name of Cokers was last mentioned in 1725, until its modern revival. 

COLBY MEWS, SE19
The Rev. Edmund Colby was appointed as Schoolmaster Fellow of Dulwich College (by the Parliamentarians) in 1645 but discharged thirteen years later. Colby Mews adjoins north of COLBY ROAD (qv).

COLBY ROAD, SE19
The Rev. Edmund Colby was appointed as Schoolmaster Fellow of Dulwich College (by the Parliamentarians) in 1645 but discharged thirteen years later. Laid out after the construction of the railway in the 1860s, one of the early occupants was Annie Besant, the 19th century social reformer.

COLLEGE GARDENS, SE21
Named in 1960. South of Dulwich Picture Gallery, in College Road, and on the site of what had formerly been the Master of Dulwich College’s garden and was later the site of a Victorian development of eight houses, also called College Gardens.

COLLEGE ROAD, SE21
The northern section of the road, from the Old College southwards as far as the Mill Pond, was originally known in the 14th century as 'Estrete' (ie East Street). Southwards from the Mill Pond the road was constructed by John Morgan, who leased fields at the foot of Grange Lane in the late 1780s, to connect Dulwich with Penge. In return he was permitted to build, and take tolls from, the Toll gate, to pay for the upkeep of what remains a private road.

COLWELL ROAD
Named in 1878, supposedly a misspelling of Coldwell as in Coldwell Clough in Derbyshire and thus part of the Derbyshire colony. The other roads are Ashbourne, Chesterfield and Melbourne Groves (qv).

CONEY ACRE, SE21
In 1626-27 Thomas Downer paid £1 rent for Conie Acre. It is known to have adjoined old fields called Newlands and the Eighteen Acres, between the present Herne Hill Velodrome and Dulwich Village. The present Coney Acre, between Rosendale Road and Croxted Road, is part of the development which includes Walkerscroft Mead and Perifield.

CONSTABLE'S WALK, SE21
Off College Road, on the west side. Named either after Colonel Constable (Colonel being his first name, not his rank), who farmed Dulwich Court Farm in the early to mid-19th century, or after the painter John Constable, who had no direct connection with Dulwich.

COPPEDHALL, SE21
The original Coppedhall was one of the houses on the north side of Dulwich Common, between the modern Gallery Road and College Road (and probably not far from the modern 'Orchard' Junior Boarding House of Dulwich College), first mentioned (as ‘le Coppedhalle’) in 1435. The name, which simply implies a tiled pitched roof, is not mentioned in the records after 1523, until its modern reappearance for a housing development in Croxted Road.

COPLESTON ROAD, SE15
Named in 1873. One of several roads in East Dulwich commemorating bishops. Edward Copleston (1776-1849) was Bishop of Llandaff. The Grove Vale end was originally called Placquett Road after Plagnett (sic) Hall Farm and was renamed Copleston Road in 1903.

CORNFLOWER TERRACE, SE22
The cornflower was said to be Edward Alleyn’s favourite flower. It is traditionally worn in his remembrance at the schools he founded. Previously called Herne Terrace.

COURT LANE, SE21
First mentioned in 1599, as ‘the highway leading from the Manor House’, and referred to as Dulwich Court Lane in 1619, from Dulwich Court Farm, later Constable's Farm (129 or so acres, formerly the demesne lands of the lord of the Manor), which lay on either side of it, the southern fields later forming the nucleus of Dulwich Park. First mentioned as Court Lane in 1834. The Court belonged to Bermondsey Abbey before the dissolution of the monasteries c1539. It was later owned by the Calton family before Edward Alleyn bought the manor of Dulwich. 

COURT LANE GARDENS, SE21
Court Lane Gardens is set back from Court Lane, on the north side of Dulwich Park.

COURTMEAD CLOSE, SE24
Named in 1968, Courtmead Close is near the northern end of Burbage Road, on the east side. Earlier, 11 copyhold acres near Cortemede, held by the Ode family for a century, are first mentioned in 1471. Court Mead (measured as 10 acres in 1605) lay on the west side of Gallery Road, next to both Gilcot Lands and Croxted Lane, and was later incorporated into the grounds of 'Belair'.

COX'S WALK, SE21 & SE26
A 1736 Lease to Thomas Dodd of Ambrook hills reserved a 6ft wide right of way, cut through Ambrook hills towards Sydenham Common before 1714 by John Cox, who was lessee of the Green Man, an inn on the site of the later Grove Tavern. as were in turn his son William, grandson Francis and great-grandson William Cox.

CRAWTHEW GROVE, SE22
Named in 1874, possibly after Thomas Crawter, Dulwich Common Commissioner in 1806.

CREBOR STREET, SE22
The street was named in 1877. Crebor Villa stood on the site. Crebor comes from crib-ber, the short ridge ; crib-ver, the great ridge ; or crib-per, the bare rock; ber also means a gentle eminence. There is a place called Crebor and an associated farm and an abandoned mine, Wheal Crebor, in Devon, near Tavistock. The vein on which the mine was developed was found when the Tavistock Canal was dug to link up the town with the River Tamar. 

CRESCENT WOOD ROAD, SE26
Formerly Crescent Road but renamed in 1891. Part of the south-eastern boundary of the old Manor, and present Dulwich Estate, bisects the 'island' between Crescent Wood Road and Sydenham Hill.

CROSSTHWAITE AVENUE, SE5
A misspelling of Crosthwaite in the Lake District, with which John Ruskin had connections. Named in 1949. See also RUSKIN WALK.

CROUCHMAN'S CLOSE, SE26
Crouchmans (first mentioned 1400) was a 3-acre piece of land on the site of the present 'Bell House' in College Road. In 1629 Edmund Redman, Dulwich husbandman, was leased a house and lands called Agnesfields, Dickriddinges and Crouchmans, 29 acres in all, for 21 years at £17 10 shillings pa. A subsequent lessee (from 1769) was Thomas Wright, who built Bell House. The name has been given to a modern development between Low Cross Wood Lane and Sydenham Hill.

CROXTED ROAD, SE21
Formerly Croxted or Croxsted Lane, or Crokstrete (suggesting an allusion to its crooked route as one possible origin for the name) and forming (from Herne Hill southwards) the greater part of the western boundary of the old Manor. First mentioned, as Crokstrete, in 1335. At some time between 1444 and 1557 Croxted Lane had become the standard name for it. In 1821 a letter from Lord Thurlow's Solicitor complained that Mr Swan [of Belair], in widening his ditch, had cut into Crockshutt [sic] Lane instead of his own estate, to the danger and inconvenience of cottages at the lower end of the lane. Writing in 1880, John Ruskin included (in 'Fiction - Fair and Foul') a description of Croxted Lane as it then was: 'Half-a-dozen handfuls of cottages are dropped here and there; the lane is a deep-rutted cart-road, diverging into various pieces of waste, and bordered in heaps of everything unclean; ashes and rags, beer bottles and old shoes [etc., etc.]'. Again, in 'Praeterita' (1885) he wrote: 'In my young days Croxted Lane was a green by-road little else than a narrow strip of untilled field...I have already noted with thankfulness the good I got out of the tadpole-haunted ditch in Croxted Lane.' 

CRYSTAL PALACE ROAD, SE22
Named in 1867, this road celebrates the transfer of the Great Exhibition from Hyde Park to Sydenham. 

CYRENA ROAD, SE22
Named in 1880 after a fossil shell, Cyrena dulwichiensis, which was discovered in the area.

DANECROFT ROAD, SE24
Named in 1902. Just outside the old Manor boundary, south-west of the old Casino estate. Believed to have been named after a house in the vicinity called Danecroft, or vice versa. In either case the derivation is unknown.

DARRELL ROAD
Named in 1870 after Sir Marmaduke Darrell (1559-1631) who married Ann Clappham in St Giles church in 1621. Sir Marmaduke of Buckinghamshire was knighted at Whitehall in 1603. He was Surveyor of Marine Victuals for the King’s Navy.

DAWSON’S HEIGHTS ESTATE, SE22
Names after Dawson’s Brick and Tile Manufactory which occupied the site. Dawson’s Hill was formerly known as Primrose Hill and Ladlands. 

DEKKER ROAD, SE21
Named in 1904 after Thomas Dekker (c.1572-1632), poet and dramatist, and contemporary of Edward Alleyn. One of the four 'D' roads linking Court Lane with Woodwarde Road, the others are Desenfans, Druce and Dovercourt Roads.

DELAWYK CRESCENT, SE24
Delawyk is an old spelling of Dulwich, dating from the 13th century, and was applied to a family which originated in the area rather than to the area itself.

DELFT WAY, SE22
Named in 1967 after Delft in the Netherlands. One of the Dutch-derived names of developments on either side of East Dulwich Grove, named in honour of the 'friendship link' between the Metropolitan Borough of Camberwell and Deventer, in the Netherlands. The other roads in the development are Arnhem Way, Deventer Crescent, Hilversum Crescent, Isel Way, Kempis Way, Nimegen Way, Steen Way and Terborch Way.

DENESMEAD, SE24
The first and only mention of the original field of this name was in 1472, as 2 acres in Denesmede, lately Richard Wyther's. Now a development between Herne Hill and Carver Road, and named in 1960.

DENMARK HILL, SE5
The Denmark Hall Public House (after which Denmark Hill was named) and attached Tea Room (which continued in operation after the public house failed in the 1790s), was built by Luke Lightfoot on the site of what is now the Fox on the Hill, in about 1770. After World War Two, four substantial mansions ranged along Denmark Hill, each with its own large estate, were compulsorily purchased by the local authority, the proceeds of sale being applied towards rebuilding, improving and enlarging the buildings of Dulwich College. 

DERWENT GROVE, SE22
Named in 1874. Part of the ‘Derbyshire colony’ of roads in East Dulwich, built between 1873 and 1885 by Ezekiel James Bailey (1829-1899), a builder from Derbyshire. The other roads are Ashbourne, Chesterfield and Melbourne Groves and Colwell Road.

DESENFANS ROAD, SE21
Named in 1906 in honour of the benefactors of Dulwich Picture Gallery, Noel (1741-1807) and Margaret (c.1737-1813) Desenfans. One of the four 'D' roads linking Court Lane with Woodwarde Road, the others are Dekker, Druce and Dovercourt Roads.

DEVENTER CRESCENT, SE22
Named in 1967 after Deventer in the Netherlands. One of the Dutch-derived names of developments on either side of East Dulwich Grove, named in honour of the 'friendship link' between the Metropolitan Borough of Camberwell and Deventer, in the Netherlands. The other roads in the development are Arnhem Way, Delft Way, Hilversum Crescent, Isel Way, Kempis Way, Nimegen Way, Steen Way and Terborch Way.

DOG KENNEL HILL, SE22
The Surrey hounds had their kennels on Dog Kennel Hill. The kennels were demolished in 1908. The name first came from the Canel family of Dulwich who appear in a 1431 deed. The Canels (or de Canels) owned a property of six acres called Canelcroft, where the Tessa Jowell Medical Centre is today. By 1597 the name of the lane from Camberwell to Canelcroft and on to Goose Green had changed to Kennalls and with the building of the dog kennels in the 18th century it was an easy transition to Dog Kennel Lane, later Hill.

DOMETT CLOSE, SE5
Named in 1952 after Alfred Domett (1811-1887), a poet and politician who became Premier of New Zealand and the subject of Robert Browning's poem ‘Waring’. One of a group of roads on the Champion Hill Estate, named after friends or connections of the Camberwell-born poet Robert Browning (1812-1889), although oddly not including one named after Browning himself. The others are Arnould Avenue, Dowson Close, Moncler Close and Wanley Road.

DONNE COURT, SE24
Named in 1958. Constance Donne was Edward Alleyn's second wife. Her father was Dr John Donne, poet and Dean of St Paul's.

DONKEY ALLEY, SE22
Named in 1993 after the donkeys who travelled along here when it was a track. In the 1870s travellers, then known as gypsies, lived on vacant land at the Lordship Lane end of Friern Road. During 1878, 260 horses, 43 donkeys and 6 goats were taken to the pound by the police. 

DOVERCOURT ROAD, SE21
Named in 1908 after a parish in Essex. No explanation of a supposed connection with Dulwich has yet been forthcoming. One of the four 'D' roads linking Court Lane with Woodwarde Road, the others are Dekker, Desenfans and Druce Roads.

DOWSON CLOSE, SE5
Named in 1952 after Ernest Christopher Dowson (1867-1895), an English poet, novelist and short-story writer from Lee. His great-uncle was Alfred Domett (qv Domett Close). One of a group of roads on the Champion Hill Estate, named after friends or connections of the Camberwell-born poet Robert Browning (1812-1889), although oddly not including one named after Browning himself. The others are Arnould Avenue, Domett Close, Moncler Close and Wanley Road. 

DRUCE ROAD, SE21
Named in 1906 after Charles Druce who founded the firm of solicitors which acted for Dulwich College and the Estates Governors for many years. One of the four 'D' roads linking Court Lane with Woodwarde Road, the others are Dekker, Desenfans and Dovercourt Roads.

DUDRICH MEWS, SE22
Takes its name from the developers, Dudrich Holdings.

DULWICH COMMON, SE21
The road that now bears this name and constitutes that part of the South Circular which bisects Dulwich from east to west, marks the northern boundary of the old Common land on which local tenants of the manor were permitted to graze their livestock, and forage for firewood and branches for fencing and building. In 1606 the Common (including the woods) extended over 300 acres. An Act of Parliament was passed in 1805 to enclose the Common, as a result of which the two remaining copyholders were allocated between them one-sixteenth of the Common (or paid off instead), and the College took the residue. It proceeded to enclose the Common that same year. 

DULWICH OAKS PLACE, SE21
A small development in College Road, by Sydenham Hill Station, named for the many oaks in Dulwich.

DULWICH VILLAGE, SE21
Formerly known simply as the High Street.

DULWICH WOOD AVENUE, SE19
Named in 1939 (having been 'The Avenue' since 1879).

DULWICH WOOD PARK, SE19
The lower part of the route (linked with Crystal Palace Parade by the southern stretch of College Road which seems more naturally to belong to Dulwich Wood Park) constructed for the opening of the Crystal Palace at Sydenham in 1854, and originally named Victoria Road. Re-named in 1876.

DUNSTANS ROAD, SE22
Named in 1877 and was the site of land known as Dunstan’s Herne, purchased by Sir Walter St John (1622-1708) for Battersea Grammar School.

DUNTON COURT, SE21
Named in 1952 after Richard Dunton or Denton (fl. 1381), one of the founders of the Hospital of St. Thomas and first English prior of Bermondsey Priory in 1380, before that it had been centred on the French abbey of Cluny. One of three blocks of flats on the Sydenham Hill Estate named after abbots (or priors) of Bermondsey Abbey (or Priory), lord of the manor of Dulwich from 1127 to the Dissolution of the Monasteries in 1538. The others are Attleborough Court and Bromleigh Court.

DYLWAYS, SE5
Another ancient variant spelling (almost, anyway - it was never actually spelt that way) of Dulwich, given to a development on Denmark Hill in 1949.

EAST DULWICH GROVE, SE22
Connecting Lordship Lane with Dulwich Village. In 1879 the old lane (formerly extending westward no further than the present Thorncombe Road), where gipsies were often to be found encamped, was extended and given its present name. In 1887 James Allen's Girls' School moved from the Village to its present site in East Dulwich Grove.

EAST DULWICH ROAD, SE22
Named in 1881, this road leads through East Dulwich to Peckham Rye

EASTLANDS CRESCENT, SE21
Took its name from Eastlands, a ‘substantial stuccoed residence standing well back from Court Lane’, and named from its position on the eastern side of the College lands. For some years it was occupied as a school and in its later years by Mr Randall Higgins (of Jones & Higgins) and subsequently by Sir Fred Hall, MP for Dulwich. The road was cut in 1931 through the former estate attached to the house.

EDGAR KAIL WAY, SE22
Named in 1996 to commemorate Dulwich Hamlet footballer Edgar Kail (1900-1976). He was the last male amateur footballer from a non-league club to play for England.

ELIOT BANK, SE26
Marking the point at which the eastern boundary of the old manor turned south-west. Derivation unknown.

ELMWOOD ROAD, SE21
Named in 1891. A house on Half Moon Lane called ‘Elm Lodge’ was noted for an enormous elm tree, about 35 feet round the trunk. By c. 1900 it had become a hollow shell, and a source of great local interest and curiosity as to how many people could sit inside it.

ELMWORTH GROVE, SE21
Part of a Council-built estate on the north side of Park Hall Road, west of Croxted Road and marking the western boundary of the old Dulwich manor.

ELSIE ROAD, SE22
Named in 1874, supposedly after a member of the family of Ezekiel James Bailey (1829-1899), builder of the ‘Derbyshire colony’.

ETHEROW STREET, SE22
Named in 1869 for the River Etherow which rises on the borders of Derbyshire. 

EYNELLA ROAD, SE22
Supposedly ‘backslang' for Alleyn (but not quite, when one works it out). Constructed in 1898 on the line of an old footpath from The Plough in Lordship Lane.

FARQUHAR ROAD, SE19
Named in 1864 after the then Chairman of the Crystal Palace Company, Thomas N. Farquhar. At the northern end, on the west side, are three c.1960 blocks of flats, namely:
GLENHURST COURT
KNOLL COURT
LOWOOD COURT
To the east of those blocks, and between Farquhar Road and Dulwich Wood Park, are another four blocks, built c.1960 and accessed by LYMER AVENUE and TYLNEY AVENUE (qv), all named after contemporaries of Edward Alleyn, and coincidentally all also commemorated as four of the eight Houses at Dulwich College, namely:
DRAKE COURT
GRENVILLE COURT 
MARLOWE COURT 
RALEIGH COURT

FELLBRIGG ROAD, SE22
Felbrigg Hall in Norfolk was the seat of the Wyndham family who intermarried with the Bowyers of Camberwell.
    
FERRINGS, SE21
A corruption of Feerings. A modern development on the west side of College Road, near the Toll gate. Feringes Coppice was mentioned in 1575 and (in Alleyn's Diary) in 1621 and last used in 1765. It took its name from an unknown member of the Feringe, Fearinge, or Feering (and a few other variations) family, mentioned as Dulwich residents and tenants from 1561 to 1658. By 1642 Feerings Coppice had become simply Feerings (being no longer woodland) and was stated to be 24 acres. It lay on the west side of College Road, from Hunt's Slip Road to just north of Sydenham Hill Station.

FERRIS ROAD, SE22
Named in 1877, derivation unknown.

FIREMANS ALLEY, SE22
Named for Dulwich Fire Station which was next to this path.

FOUNTAIN DRIVE, SE19
Known as Fountain Road until 1938, named after the drinking fountain which stood in the nearby Crystal Palace Parade.

FRANK DIXON CLOSE, SE21
With the adjoining Frank Dixon Way, was named in 1959-60 after an Estates and College Governor of the 1930s.

FRANK DIXON WAY, SE21
With the adjoining Frank Dixon Close, was named in 1959-60 after an Estates and College Governor of the 1930s.

FRIERN ROAD, SE22
Named in 1868. Much of East Dulwich was in the manor of Friern. In the Middle Ages this manor belonged to the priory of Halliwell, Shoreditch. As Halliwell was a house of nuns, lay-brothers or ‘freren’ managed the manor and that is how it received its name. The manor house was where the junction of Friern Road and Underhill Road are now.

FROGLEY ROAD, SE22
Named in 1864, derivation unknown.

GAINSBOROUGH COURT, SE21
In College Road, just north of the Toll gate, and named after the artist Gainsborough, who has no known connection with Dulwich other than that paintings by him hang in the Dulwich Picture Gallery.

GALLERY ROAD, SE21
Formerly Back Lane, from the Village to Dulwich Common. The Court Rolls for 1621 reported that ‘the road next to the College, on the west part, is virtually ruined, but Edward Alleyn has laid out a piece of land, containing 60 rods, adjoining the same, for a new road, to be made up at his expense (with a bridge over the common sewer there) but afterwards to be maintained by the inhabitants.’  Takes its name from the Dulwich Picture Gallery, the first public picture gallery in London (and arguably anywhere in the world), designed by Sir John Soane and built in 1814. The original collection was built up by various gifts and bequests to the College, greatly added to by Sir Peter Francis Bourgeois and by Noel Desenfans and his wife Margaret, whose mausoleum adjoins the Gallery on the Gallery Road side. Further south, on the west side, stands 'Belair'

GARVENS, SE19
A misreading of Gawens. Like Feerings, this had been coppice woodland (24 acres), grubbed up during Edward Alleyn's time, and lay on the east side of the present Alleyn Park, north of Dulwich Wood Park. The land took its name from an unidentified member of the Gaweyn family, mentioned in the Dulwich records numerous times between 1399 and 1468. The modern Garvens is a small development on the south side of the western end of Dulwich Wood Avenue, near Gipsy Hill.

GILES COPPICE, SE19
Named in 1960 but the first mention of the name is in 1626, recording a sale by Edward Alleyn to William Sewer of the woods, underwoods, trees & bushes in Gileses Coppice. Further such sales are recorded more or less regularly every ten years until 1695, shortly after which date the name ceased to be used and we can guess that Lapse Wood was extended to include it. The modern road extends south from Kingswood Drive, stopping just short of Dulwich Wood Park. 

GILKES CRESCENT, SE21
Named in memory of Arthur Herman Gilkes, Master of Dulwich College 1885-1914, and laid out in 1923, the year after Gilkes' death. Runs from East Dulwich Grove to Calton Avenue

GILKES PLACE, SE21
Formerly Elms Road and renamed, with GILKES CRESCENT (qv), in 1938.

GIPSY HILL, SE19
Named for the gipsies whose encampments were a frequent feature of the Dulwich and Norwood woods before the 19th century. The eastern side of the road (as far south as Colby Road), along which lay a tributary of the river Effra, marked the western boundary of the Dulwich estate.

GLAZEBROOK CLOSE, SE21
Sir Richard Tetley Glazebrook, a writer on Physics (1854-1926), went to Dulwich College, as did three of his cousins, one of whom, Canon Michael Glazebrook (1853-1926) was President of the Alleyn Club (the Old Boys' association of Dulwich College) in 1882. Glazebrook Close, named after one or other of them, is the main part of the estate north of Acacia Grove.

GLENGARRY ROAD, SE22
Named in 1879 for Glen Garry in Scotland.

GLENNIE COURT, SE22
Block of flats on the Lordship Lane estate at the junction of Dulwich Common and Lordship Lane and named in 1950 after Dr William Glennie (1761-1828) who ran a school on the site attended by Lord Byron.

GOODRICH ROAD, SE22
One of several roads in East Dulwich commemorating bishops. Named in 1868 after Thomas Goodrich who was Bishop of Ely from 1534 until his death in 1554.

GOOSE GREEN, SE22
The village green of East Dulwich which long ago was connected to Peckham Rye Common. Part of the manor of Camberwell Friern it was purchased as an open space in 1868. One theory on how it received its name is from the time when Mrs Dench kept donkeys and geese on the green. Another theory is it derives from Gorse Green. There was a pound for stray animals here, as seen on Dewhirst’s 1842 map. There were also two ponds, one on the site of St John’s church.

GOWLETT ROAD, SE15
Named after Henry Gowlett Smallman (1826-1896), publican and large-scale builder in Wandsworth, Brixton Hill and East Dulwich who built the Gowlett Arms.

GRANGE LANE, SE21
A lease granted in 1745 reserved an 11ft-wide cartway (now Grange Lane) for the College, through to its woods. The Grange, built by Thomas Lett in about 1812, stands half-way up Grange Lane, on the site of a much earlier building (called New Barn in 1746), and gives it its present name (it was previously called Occupation Road). It was largely rebuilt after World War Two by Gerald Fairlie, who lived there for many years.

GREAT BROWNINGS, SE21
Brownynges is first mentioned in 1405, and two closes called greate Browninges and lyttell Browninges in 1575. Although the evidence is not entirely consistent, Great Brownings (at the Village end of Court Lane, on the north-east side) seems to have been about seven acres, and Little Brownings (south-west of it, on the same side of Court Lane) comprised two parcels, each of about 3½ acres. Great Brownings seems to have been retained, along with Howletts on the south side of the old College, for the College's own purposes, until the land was developed in the 19th century. The name has been given to a secluded modern development on the east side of College Road, looping up northwards to Low Cross Wood Lane.

GREAT SPILMANS, SE22
First mentioned, as Spendelmanfeld, in 1404, and later divided into Great and Little Spilmans. Both were included from 1659 onwards in leases of what became eventually the Belair estate, although from 1743 Great Spilmans, which conveniently lay opposite the back gate of the old College, was retained by the College for its own use. It later became Lloyds Register Sports Ground. The modern development of that name lies south of East Dulwich Grove, opposite James Allen’s Girls’ School and was named in 1964.

GREEN DALE, SE5 and SE22
Formerly Green Lane, until the mid-20th century. Its northern half was newly carved in 1806 across old fields, but its southern section was a grassed lane, probably of great antiquity, leading to the old parish church of St Giles, Camberwell.

GROVE VALE, SE22
An ancient road, shown on Rocque’s map of 1741-5 contrasts with Grove Hill at the top of Dog Kennel Hill and is a continuation of Grove Lane. It was formerly part of Dog Kennel Lane.

GYLCOTE CLOSE, SE5
First mentioned, as Gylcoteland, in a Survey of Dulwich Woods of about 1542. A field called Gillcotts lands (4 acres) was leased by Francis Calton to John Bone, with Hall Place, in 1597. Gilcott Lands was included from 1659 onwards in leases of what became eventually the Belair estate. The modern variation, Gylcote Close, is a southern spur of Crossthwaite Avenue.
 
HALF MOON LANE, SE24 
Known from ancient times as Greenstreet, and from the 1720s until about 1800 as Ireland Green (after James and Thomas Ireland who leased land adjoining it from the College). According to local tradition, an inn has stood on the site at the west end of the lane, nearest Herne Hill, since the middle of the 17th century, but the first public house ‘known by the Sign of the Half Moon’ was built by Joseph Miller in 1760. In 1844 Edward Alleyn's original tombstone, removed many years before from the College Chapel, was rediscovered in the skittle ground of the Half Moon. Between 1894 and 1896 the old Half Moon, much frequented by visitors from London on account of its garden and rustic surroundings, was rebuilt.

HAMBLEDON PLACE, SE21
On the south side of Dulwich Common, on the site of a house originally Toksowa (built c.1790), later the Toksowa Hotel, and renamed Hambledon House, a slight misspelling of the name of Lord Hambleden, a member of the WH Smith family and a benefactor of King's College Hospital. From the 1950s to the 1970s it was used as a hostel for nurses at King's College Hospital.

HANSLER ROAD, SE22
Named in 1879. Possibly a variant spelling of Henslowe, after Philip Henslowe (c.1550-1616), Edward Alleyn’s father-in-law and business partner. Henslowe’s surname appears in a variety of spellings in contemporary documents.

HAYES GROVE, SE22
Commemorates Surrey cricketer Ernest George Hayes (1876-1953) who was born in Peckham.

HEBER ROAD, SE22
One of several roads in East Dulwich commemorating bishops. Named after Reginald Heber (1783-1826), poet and hymnwriter, who became prebendary of St Asaph in 1812 and Bishop of Calcutta in 1822 until his death in 1826.

HENSLOWE ROAD
Named in 1870 after Philip Henslowe who was the father-in-law and business partner of Edward Alleyn. Henslowe married Agness Woodwarde and in 1592 Alleyn married Joan Woodwarde, her daughter.

HERNE HILL, SE24
First identified as such on a Surrey map of 1789. Reputedly a corruption of Heron Hill, being supposedly a haunt of that species, but more probably identifiable with 'Le Herne', a local field name recorded c.1490. The road was named in 1883, and marks part of the north-western boundary of the old Manor of Dulwich.

HILLCOURT ROAD, SE22
Named in 1878 for Hillcourt, a large house which stood nearby.

HILLSBOROUGH ROAD, SE22
Marks an old footpath connecting East Dulwich and the Village. Named in 1884 after the parish in Yorkshire where Edward Alleyn owned property.

HILVERSUM CRESCENT, SE22
Named in 1967 after Hilversum in the Netherlands. One of the Dutch-derived names of developments on either side of East Dulwich Grove, named in honour of the 'friendship link' between the Metropolitan Borough of Camberwell and Deventer, in the Netherlands. The other roads in the development are Arnhem Way, Delft Way, Deventer Crescent, Isel Way, Kempis Way, Nimegen Way, Steen Way and Terborch Way.

HINDMANS ROAD
Named in 1868, possibly after its builder.

HITHERWOOD DRIVE, SE19
Turning south from Kingswood Drive and emerging into College Road. Hither Wood was not one of the Dulwich Woods, although there is one reference, on the 1808 Estate Map, to Hither Kings Wood (to distinguish it from Further Kings Wood).

HOGARTH COURT, SE19
Off Fountain Drive. Named in 1965, presumably after William Hogarth, the 18th century artist, represented by two paintings in Dulwich Picture Gallery.

HOLLINGBOURNE ROAD, SE24
Named, inexplicably, after Hollingbourne, a parish in Kent, in 1891.

HOME MEADOW MEWS, SE22
Named in 2010, presumably after a field on the Friern Manor farm estate.

HOWARD WAY, SE22
Named in 1985 to commemorate Howard, an artist who was a friend of Dr Glennie. One of the access roads on the development at the junction of Dulwich Common and Lordship Lane named for friends of Dr William Glennie (1761-1828) whose 18th century school was nearby. The others are Barclay Way, Barker Way, Hunt Way, Moore Way and Wilkie Way.

HOWLETT'S ROAD, SE24
According to Blanch, the Camberwell historian, Howlettes Acre in Half Moon Lane was given by Sir Edmond Bowyer in 1626 to the use of the poor of Camberwell and was sold by the parish to Mr George Keen of Herne Hill in 1858. In 1888 JP Thol occupied 'Howlettes', a house (& two acres) on the south side of Half Moon Lane. A completely different parcel of land called Howletts Mead, or 'The Howletts', or 'Howlettes Green', lay south of the old College, occupying most of the area between Gallery Road and College Road. 

HUNTERS MEADOW, SE19
A modern invention. No such name appears in historical Dulwich records, although a Hunters Hill (two acres) is mentioned in a survey made in about 1600, but was probably a part of the land adjoining Red Post Hill that happened, at the time, to be occupied by a Henry Hunter.

HUNT'S SLIP ROAD, SE21
Formerly Union Road. Connecting College Road with Alleyn Park and crossing over the railway between West Dulwich and Sydenham Hill. Named in 1936, after Mr Hunt who had recently leased adjoining land.

HUNT WAY, SE22
Named in 1985 to commemorate Leigh Hunt (1784-1859), critic, essayist and poet and friend of Dr Glennie. One of the access roads on the development at the junction of Dulwich Common and Lordship Lane named for friends of Dr William Glennie (1761-1828) whose 18th century school was nearby. The others are Barclay Way, Barker Way, Moore Way and Wilkie Way.

ILDERSLY GROVE, SE21
Believed to be a misspelling of the surname of Thomas Iddersleigh, one time Secretary of the Crystal Palace Company, although the theory seems implausible. However, the derivation of the name is otherwise unexplained.

ISEL WAY, SE22
Named in 1967 after the river Ysel in the Netherlands but using an anglicised spelling. One of the Dutch-derived names of developments on either side of East Dulwich Grove, named in honour of the 'friendship link' between the Metropolitan Borough of Camberwell and Deventer, in the Netherlands. The other roads in the development are Arnhem Way, Delft Way, Deventer Crescent, Hilversum Crescent, Kempis Way, Nimegen Way, Steen Way and Terborch Way.

JARVIS ROAD
Named in 1887 for Henry Jarvis (1816-1900) architect and district surveyor for the parish of St Giles. He designed Dulwich Hospital and lived at 502 Lordship Lane. 

JASPER ROAD, SE19
Located at the far south-western extremity of Dulwich manor, only the northern side of this road is part of the Dulwich Estate. Named in 1870, possibly from Sir Walter Scott's novel 'Monastery' (although the connection is unclear).

JENNINGS ROAD, SE22
Named in 1867 after David Jennings (1691-1762) a trainer of dissenting minsters in the 18th century.

KELMORE GROVE, SE22
Named in 1877, a misspelling for Kelmore in Scotland.

KEMPIS WAY, SE22
Named in 1967 after Thomas à Kempis, the 15th century religious writer who studied at Deventer in the Netherlands. One of the Dutch-derived names of developments on either side of East Dulwich Grove, named in honour of the 'friendship link' between the Metropolitan Borough of Camberwell and Deventer, in the Netherlands. The other roads in the development are Arnhem Way, Delft Way, Deventer Crescent, Hilversum Crescent, Isel Way, Nimegen Way, Steen Way and Terborch Way.

KENNOLDES, SE21
First mentioned in the Court Rolls for 1404, as 26 acres formerly called Gerardes, now Kinelles, after Sir Robert Knolles (evidently pronounced with a hard 'k'). Dealings involving the freehold Kenelles or Kennalls (probably approximating to the area between the east ends of Burbage Road and Turney Road, and about six acres) figure frequently up to 1606, when Edward Alleyn bought it. The name is now applied to a housing estate in Croxted Road, north of Acacia Grove.

KINGSWOOD DRIVE, SE19
Named for Kingswood House, built by William Vizard in 1811-12 in the middle of an estate of 75 acres, for which he paid £300 rent a year. In 1892 John Lawson Johnston (‘Mr Bovril) was granted a lease of it, and after World War One the Vestey family took over, remaining there until after World War Two. The estate, or what had not already been built on at its fringes, was taken over by the local authority, and in 1956 Kingswood House was re-opened as the new Kingswood Centre. The various blocks of flats on the estate take their names from men associated with the old College foundation before 1858. Kingswood Drive itself was named in 1891.

KNIGHTS HILL, SE21
The Knight family was prominent in Dulwich and West Norwood from the 15th to the 17th centuries. Knights Hill itself, west of Rosendale Road (not to be confused with the Knights Hill linking West Norwood with Beulah Hill, SE27) is first mentioned in the Dulwich Court Rolls, by reference to ‘... the pound outside the manor called Knighte[s]hill pound...’, in 1608. Lord Thurlow, the then Lord Chancellor, bought the Knights Hill Estate from the Duke of St Albans in 1785, and in 1846 his heirs sold it to Charles Ranken (another lawyer) of Belair. Ranken's heirs in turn sold it in 1859 to Dulwich College, which promptly made a handsome profit on the deal by selling off part of it to the railway company.

LACON ROAD, SE22
Named in 1874 after one of its original terraces, Lacon Terrace.

LADLANDS, SE22
Named in 1971 for Ladlands Hill on which it was built.

LANDCROFT ROAD, SE22
Named in 1867, it takes its name from a field on the Friern Manor Farm estate.

LANDELLS ROAD, SE22
Named in 1868 commemorating Ebenezer Landells (1808-1860), a wood engraver wood-engraver, illustrator, and magazine proprietor who co-founded Punch. See also Rodwell Road

LAPSE WOOD WALK, SE23
'Lapsewood' was a mansion built on Sydenham Hill by Charles Barry, who lived there for many years. It was later converted into flats and has now been demolished. The name first occurs as 'the Loppes' (an alternative name for Ambrook Hill Coppice) in 1581. By 1790 it was referred to as the Laps, and in 1798 the College Surveyor, John Dugleby, recorded that ‘... the Lapse is now designed to remain in future as a wood... ‘. The Lapse is the most easterly wood shown on the Estate Map of 1808.

LINCOLN MEWS, SE21
Adjoining Lings Coppice. No known authentic derivation. 

LINGS COPPICE, SE21 
Named in 1965 but first mentioned in a survey done for Henry VIII in 1542-43, Lings Coppice lay south of the old mansion called Hall Place, within an area now bounded approximately by South Croxted Road, Church Approach, and Alleyn Road/Alleyn Park. From 1633 (by which time it had been converted to pasture and divided into four or five closes) it was invariably leased with Hall Place. After 1685 the name fell into disuse, until its modern revival.

LITTLE BORNES, SE21
In 1606 Thomas Calton sold to his elder brother Sir Francis ‘part of litle bornes (two acres) the west end of which lies toward Croxted Lane, late occupied by Thomas Fearinge deceased’. Little Bornes originally lay between Great Bornes and Napps in Croxted Road, and the present railway line between Tulse Hill and North Dulwich bisects the old field. Its modern counterpart is a development in Alleyn Park, south of Kingsdale School.

LITTLE BROWNINGS, SE23
For derivation and original site, see under Great Brownings. The two parcels of Little Brownings eventually re-amalgamated as one 7 acre field, leased in 1663 with other land on the east and west sides of Dulwich Village to Daniel Scrivener. After 1718 the name was discontinued, until its revival in the 1960s for a development off Sydenham Rise.

LOGGETTS, SE21
A 1972 development of three houses and six maisonettes on the site of 63 and 65 Alleyn Park, and named after an Elizabethan game, similar to that of 'Aunt Sally', which is mentioned in the old Court Rolls.

LORD'S CLOSE, SE21
Off Thurlow Park Road. The name may be a corruption of Lordscroft (a 2-acre field mentioned once, in 1507), or possibly of the Lordship Close (a 3-acre field in the vicinity of Red Post Hill, recorded from 1605 to 1611), or could perhaps be a reference to Lord Thurlow. 

LORDSHIP LANE, SE22
An ancient road, dividing the two manors, or 'Lordships' of Dulwich and Camberwell-Friern, known as such since at least the 17th century, and probably for several centuries before that. Part of an old route from London to the south, being a continuation of Dog Kennel Lane (now Dog Kennel Hill).

LOVELACE ROAD, SE21
On the Knight's Hill Estate. Derivation unknown, unless it is named after Richard Lovelace, 17th century poet, of whom a portrait, with those of two others of his family, hangs in Dulwich Picture Gallery.

LOVERS WALK, SE21
The path between Gallery Road and College Road, now known as Lovers Walk, but once referred to as the Grove or Grove Gate, hence the Grove Field which lay on its south side.

LOW CROSS WOOD LANE, SE21 
In 1787 John Morgan, lord of the manor of Penge and a lessee of Dulwich property in the Grange Lane area, proposed making a new road from Penge to Dulwich High Road, via Dulwich Common, at his own cost, with free use by the College and its tenants, and in that year he was granted a lease of ‘so much of the College Wood adjoining Penge Common and Low Cross Lane as should be necessary to make a road, not more than 30 ft wide, from the top of the wood down to the fields in his occupation’. In 1789 it was reported by the College Surveyor that ‘The Road down Locus Lane is now the admiration of the County... ‘. The road in question was the modern COLLEGE ROAD, (qv), Low Cross Wood Lane (formerly called Church Walk) being now a footpath linking that road with Crescent Wood Road.

LYALL AVENUE, SE21
On the Kingswood Estate. Named in 1950 after Sir Alfred Comyn Lyall, a Governor of Dulwich College, appointed in 1891.

LYMER AVENUE, SE19
The Rev. Cornelius Lymer, having been Chaplain of Christ Church College, Oxford, was appointed the first Chaplain to Alleyn's College of God's Gift on 31st August 1616, officiating at the consecration of the College Chapel. He left the Foundation on 30th September 1617.

LYTCOTT GROVE, SE22
Named in 1879 to commemorate Colonel Leonard Lytcott fought in the Parliamentary army during the English Civil War. In 1662 he took the lease on a farm in Dulwich around where Dulwich Library and Dulwich Common are now. He died of plague in 1665, as did his wife Susanna, four sons Thomas, Benjamin, Leonard and Temple and two servants.

MARCUS GARVEY MEWS, SE22
Named in 1995 to commemorate Marcus Garvey (1887-1940), the Jamaican political activist, publisher, journalist and entrepreneur.

MARMORA ROAD, SE22
Named in 1878 and one of the four local roads which commemorate the Crimean War, the others are Mundania, Scutari and Therapia Roads. The Sea of Marmora is en route to Crimea.

MARSDEN ROAD, SE22
Named in 1884 after George William Marsden (1812-1893), solicitor and Camberwell Vestry Clerk from 1852 until his death. He represented Camberwell in the Charity Commissioners enquiry which preceded the passing of the 1857 Dulwich College Act. He was also instrumental in securing the land for Camberwell Old Cemetery. He lived at 113 Camberwell Grove.

MATHAM GROVE, SE22
Named in 1879. Jacobus and Theodor Matham were 17th century Dutch engravers, often engraving works of Bassano (qv).

MAXWELL COURT, SE22
Block of flats on the Lordship Lane estate at the junction of Dulwich Common and Lordship Lane and named in 1950 after Charles Maxwell who bought The Green Man public house in 1774 and renamed it Dulwich Grove.

MCLEOD COURT, SE22
Block of flats on the Lordship Lane estate at the junction of Dulwich Common and Lordship Lane and named in 1950 after Sir Donald Friell McLeod (1810-1872), who was a pupil at a school on the site run by Dr William Glennie and later became Lieutenant-Governor of the Punjab. He was one of the founders of Lahore Oriental College, now part of the Punjab University. On his retirement in 1870, he returned to England and settled in London where he died in 1872 following a horrific accident when he was dragged along the platform by a train at Gloucester Road tube station.

MELBOURNE GROVE, SE22
Named in 1878. Part of the ‘Derbyshire colony’ of roads in East Dulwich, built between 1873 and 1885 by Ezekiel James Bailey (1829-1899), a builder from Derbyshire. The other roads are Ashbourne, Chesterfield and Derwent Groves and Colwell Road (qv).

MELFORD ROAD, SE22
Named in 1866, possibly after Long Melford in Suffolk.

MILO ROAD, SE22
Connects Beauval Road with Lordship Lane. Named in 1894, possibly after Milo (or Milon), the 6th century Greek athlete who, however, is not thought to have had any connection with Dulwich!

MITCHELL'S PLACE, SE21
This gated development off Aysgarth Rd and behind 88-94 Dulwich Village occupies a building yard variously named for the builders who occupied it. In the late 18th century it was called Tristram's Yard, after William Tristram, the Village builder century, then Lloyd's Yard after the carpenter who occupied the premises adjoining ‘the High Street’ (now Dulwich Village) in 1837. From the late 19th century it was called Mitchell's Yard after WJ Mitchell, builder of many Dulwich houses and buildings.

MONCLAR ROAD, SE5
Named in 1952 after Count Andre Victor Amédée de Ripert-Monclar (1807-1871), French economist and royalist and Paris neighbour of Browning’s uncle. One of a group of roads on the Champion Hill Estate, named after friends or connections of the Camberwell-born poet Robert Browning (1812-1889), although oddly not including one named after Browning himself.

MOORE WAY, SE22
Named in 1985 to commemorate?. One of the access roads on the development at the junction of Dulwich Common and Lordship Lane named for friends of Dr William Glennie (1761-1828) whose 18th century school was nearby. The others are Barclay Way, Barker Way, Howard Way, Hunt Way and Wilkie Way.

MORKYNS WALK, SE21
This small development in Alleyn Park was named in 1970. The original field called Morkyns may have been named after Reginald, Richard, Robert, or Roger Morkyn, all of whom figure in the manorial Court Rolls between 1333 and 1335, but more probably after Roger Morkyn, who alone survived until 1376 (and perhaps longer). It comprised ‘a tenement & 17 acres called Morkynes’ and judging by one or two references cannot have been far from the present Half Moon Lane.

MOUNT ADON PARK, SE22
Named in 1881 and built on the site of Adon Mount, the home of James Henderson who started the South London Press in 1865.

MULBERRY CLOSE, SE22
Named in 1991 and chosen by the developer because he liked the sound of it.

MUNDANIA ROAD, SE22
Named in 1878 and one of the four local roads which commemorate the Crimean War, the others are Marmora, Scutari and Therapia Roads.  Mundania (Mundanya) is a town by the Sea of Marmora. 

MUSCHAMP ROAD, SE22
Named in 1877 after the ancient Muschamp family, prominent in Camberwell and Peckham in the 16th and 17th centuries.

NAIRNE GROVE, SE24
Named in 1923 after Sir Percival Nairne, a resident of North Dulwich. On the east side of Sunray Avenue.

NIMEGEN WAY, SE22
Named in 1967 after Nijmegan in the Netherlands but using the Anglicised spelling. One of the Dutch-derived names of developments on either side of East Dulwich Grove, named in honour of the 'friendship link' between the Metropolitan Borough of Camberwell and Deventer, in the Netherlands. The other roads in the development are Arnhem Way, Delft Way, Deventer Crescent, Hilversum Crescent, Isel Way, Kempis Way, Steen Way and Terborch Way.

NORCROFT GARDENS, SE22
Named in 1964, North Crofts was a plot of land in Dulwich.

NORTHCROFTS, SE22
A development next to the Territorial Army Centre in Lordship Lane. The original 15 acre Northcroft, first mentioned in 1402 (when it was divided up into typically 2-acre strips, in various ownerships), was a triangular field, the present boundaries of which would be Half Moon Lane, Herne Hill, and Ruskin Walk. After 1606 it was leased out as part of Alleyn's Dulwich estate and used as pasture. In 'Praeterita' (1885), John Ruskin wrote: ‘Central in each amphitheatre, the crowning glory of Herne Hill was accordingly that, after walking along its ridge southward from London through a mile of chestnut, lilac and apple trees hanging over the wooden palings on each side, suddenly the trees stopped on the left, and out one came on the top of the field [ie Northcrofts] sloping down to the South into Dulwich Valley - open field animate with cow and buttercup, and below, the beautiful meadows and high avenues of Dulwich; and beyond, all that crescent of the Norwood Hills’.

NORTH CROSS ROAD, SE22
Named in 1884 after North Crofts, a plot of land in Dulwich.

NUTFIELD ROAD, SE22
Named in 1864 after a road in Fermanagh, Northern Ireland.

OAKFIELD GARDENS, SE19
Takes its name from one of the three houses called Oakfield which at one time or another have been found at different locations in Dulwich, this one being originally opposite the present development.

OAKHURST GROVE, SE22
Named in 1877. May have taken its name from a large country seat in Berkshire or Shropshire [but more likely to be a reference to the many oaks of Dulwich’].

OGLANDER ROAD, SE22
Named in 1877 for Sir John Oglander (1585-1655), MP for Yarmouth on the Isle of Wight and diarist, who married Frances Moore, sister-in-law of Thomas Grymes (aka Crimes and Graham) of the ancient and landed family of Peckham.

ONDINE ROAD, SE22
Named in 1881 after Ondine, aka Undine, a water nymph.

OVERHILL ROAD, SE22
Named in 1867. After naming an adjoining road Underhill Road it was felt appropriate to name this one Overhill Road.

OXENFORD ROAD, SE22
Named in 1902 after John Oxenford (1812-1877), a dramatist, critic and translator. He was born in Camberwell though he does not appear to have lived here for long.

OXONIAN STREET, SE22
Named in 1882. Oxonia is Latin for Oxford so supposedly refers to natives of Oxford residing on this site at some time but there is no evidence for this.

PECKARMANS WOOD, SE26
A modern development named in 1956, snaking deep into old Dulwich woodland along the brow of the hill from Crescent Wood Road. Peckamins, first mentioned in 1621, was a 17-acre field of pasture which had been converted from coppice woodland and remained so, although another larger parcel of the former Peckamins Coppice (25 acres or so) retained its wooded character and its name until the early 1800s. As for the derivation of the name, perhaps, at the time that Dulwich Manor was owned by the Priory of Bermondsey, there was a dispute about rights of common for tenants of its various manors (we know of one such dispute in 1225), and men from Peckham were given rights of common in specific parts of the Dulwich woods which thus became known as the Peckham men's coppice, the modern name being a contraction or corruption of that.

PELLATT ROAD, SE22
Named in 1867 after Apsley Pellatt (1791-1863), a factory owner, politician and prominent member of the congregational body. He inherited his father’s Southwark glass factory and developed an innovative process for the enclosure of ceramics within glass. He was MP for Southwark 1852-1857. He was largely instrumental in securing the admission of Jews to the freedom of the city of London. Pellatt was twice married, first, in 1814, to Sophronia, daughter of George Kemp of Reading (she died in February 1815); secondly, in 1816, to Margaret Elizabeth, daughter of George Evans of Balham, who survived him. He died in 1863 and left three daughters, his only son having died about 1839. 

PERIFIELD, SE21
The site of the original Perifield (first mentioned in 1329) can be located to the site presently occupied by the Charter School, North Dulwich (variously Dulwich High School for Boys and William Penn School), and its history, remarkably, can be continuously traced from 1373 to the present day. The name means 'the field of pear trees'. In 1606 it was sold to Edward Alleyn, and thereafter its history is documented in leases granted by Alleyn and subsequently by Dulwich College, almost all of which are still extant. The modern Perifield is west of Croxted Road, adjoining Walkerscroft Mead, Pymers Mead, etc.

PICKWICK ROAD, SE21 
Named in honour of Charles Dickens' creation Mr Pickwick, who spent the end of his fictional life in retirement in Dulwich. Dickens reputedly attended several Dulwich Club dinners at the Greyhound inn (although there is no record in the club minutes of him doing so), and the road was constructed in 1906 across the vacant site of the old inn, to Turney Road. 

PIERMONT GREEN, SE22
Named for Piermont Road (qv).

PIERMONT ROAD, SE22
Named in 1867 and originally called Piermost Road. It is believed to be named after a local builder in Upland Road. The reason for the change is unknown.

PLACQUETT ROAD, SE22
See Copleston Road.

PLAYFIELD CRESCENT, SE22
Constructed in 1902 and supposedly named because Alleyn's School's playing fields adjoin it.

PLOUGH LANE, SE22
Borders one side of the Plough Inn. Can be seen on Dewhirst’s 1842 map.

POND COTTAGES, SE21
First mentioned as 'Millpond Cottages' in 1791, when leased to William Oxlade.

POND MEAD, SE22
Named in 1958 after Pond House (formerly Pond Place), an 18th century mansion at the junction of Red Post Hill and Village Way, and in the former grounds of which the modern development was built.

PYMERS MEAD, SE21
When in the 1960s the local authority was trawling for possible names for new housing developments, including those on the west side of Croxted Road, one of those submitted was Pynners Mead, but unfortunately the name has now been perpetuated as the meaningless Pymers Mead. The local authority got the name right, however, in naming one of the blocks of flats along Herne Hill as Pynnersmead. The original Pynners Mead or Pynners Leasue (indeed, the latter variant appears more often, a leasue being another term for a meadow) was about 3½ acres somewhere in the area bounded by Danecroft Road, Elmwood Road, Red Post Hill and Herne Hill, and was possibly named after Richard de Pynnore, who witnessed a Dulwich deed in 1340, or after Margaret Pynnor, mentioned in a Deed of Release of unspecified Dulwich property in 1473.

PYTCHLEY ROAD, SE22
Named in 1932 and took its name from the Pytchley hunt in Leicestershire. One of a number of roads believed to have been named after hunts, in recognition of hunting in Dulwich. Other roads include Albrighton and Quorn Roads.

QUORN ROAD, SE22
Named in 1932 and took its name from the Quorn hunt in Leicestershire. One of a number of roads believed to have been named after hunts, in recognition of hunting in Dulwich. Other roads include Albrighton and Pytchley Roads.

RAILWAY RISE, SE22
Named in 1868 when Champion Hill station (later renamed to East Dulwich station) was opened.

READING CLOSE, SE22
Derivation unknown.

RED POST HILL, SE24 & SE22
The ancient highway from Dulwich to London, formerly (from at least 1335 until at least 1788) called Aspole or Ashpole Lane. Its more modern name ‘is derived from the old signpost on Denmark Hill which for some reason or another was painted red.’  At its southern end was formerly the Crooked Billet, later known successively as the King's Head and the White Hart, which was demolished in 1902. North Dulwich Railway Station, originally serving the London & Sutton line, dates from 1866.

ROCKELLS PLACE, SE22
Derivation unknown.

ROCK HILL, SE26
Formerly Reservoir Road, this is a walkway linking College Road with Sydenham Hill, and an even steeper climb than Low Cross Wood Lane. Named after the house called Rockhills, home of Sir Joseph Paxton, near the Crystal Palace.

RODWELL ROAD, SE22
Named in 1867 to commemorate the composer, musical director and author George Herbert Buonaparte Rodwell (1800-1852). He married Emma Liston, the daughter of John Liston the comedian. Their daughter married Robert Landells, son of Ebenezer Landells, wood-engraver, illustrator, and co-founder of Punch. See Landells Road.

ROSEDALE ROAD, SE21
Whoever thought this one up did not spare much thought for the postal services, as this road is right next to its near namesake Rosendale Road, with which it is no doubt often confused. It runs parallel with Walkerscroft Mead.

ROSENDALE ROAD, SE21
Named after Rosendale Hall, erected 1658 and demolished in the early 20th century. The road was originally intended as a grand avenue leading towards the Crystal Palace, a plan effectively spoiled by the owner of the Tritton Road site who built across the intended route. Only part of Rosendale Road passes through the Dulwich Estate, and that only because the College bought the Knights Hill Estate in 1860.

ROSEWAY, SE21
Built, as part of the Estates Governors' Cottage Building Scheme shortly after World War Two, on a meadow long used by Causton's Athletic Club.

ROUSE GARDENS, SE21
Named in 1961 after Harold Lindsey Rouse, a director of Midland Bank Ltd, Alleyn Old Boy and local resident, who died in 1959.

RUSKIN WALK, SE24
The Victorian writer and critic John Ruskin lived much of his life in the Herne Hill area. From 1823-43 at a house on the site of 26 Herne Hill, and from 1843 to 1872 leasing from the College a house (later 163 Denmark Hill) built in 1807. After Ruskin's time his house became the Ruskin Manor Hotel. It was demolished in 1949. Ruskin Walk was a new road constructed in the 19th century roughly on the line of an old walkway called Simpson's Alley.

RYECOTES MEAD, SE21
The present development was named in 1966. John and Cristina de Reygate figure as vendors in a sale of a freehold messuage and 9 acres of land in Dylewissh in 1311, and in 1405 Sir Robert Denny's holdings in Dulwich included ‘the tenement lately called Reygates’. This property passed to the Legh family of Streatham, who sold it to the Drapers of Camberwell in 1542, and the last surviving Draper, Matthew, left it in his will to Sir Edmund Bowyer of Camberwell, who sold it in 1609 to Edward Alleyn. Unfortunately, there are no definite clues as to where within Dulwich manor the property lay. We have much better information on another, although unrelated, parcel called Rigates Green, which was encircled by Dulwich Common Wood and comprised 60 acres roughly where the various sports grounds on the south side of Dulwich Common are now to be found, and included the fields called Cokers. The house called Ryecotes, from which Ryecotes Mead directly takes its name, was named by William Young, a College and Estates Governor (and local historian), who occupied it from 1858. In 1909 it was home to Sir Hiram Maxim, inventor of the Maxim gun, who is buried in West Norwood Cemetery. The house was demolished to make way for the present development.

RYCOTT PATH, SE22
Named in 1962 and takes its name from Rycotts (aka Ricotes, Rigates), a plot of land in Dulwich in the 16th-17th centuries.

RYEDALE, SE22
Named in 1903 to contrast with Rye Hill which is on the other side of Peckham.

ST AIDANS ROAD, SE22
Named in 1884 and one of several roads in East Dulwich commemorating bishops, in this case St Aidan (-651), the first bishop of Lindisfarne.

ST BARNABAS CLOSE, SE22
Named in 1998 after the parish of St Barnabas. 

ST FRANCIS ROAD, SE22
Named in 1969 after St Francis Hospital. It had previously been called Constance Road.

SCUTARI ROAD, SE22
Named in 1878 after Florence Nightingale’s hospital at Scutari. One of the four local roads which commemorate the Crimean War, the others are Marmora, Mundania and Therapia Roads.

SEELEY DRIVE, SE21
On the Kingswood Estate. Named after Harry Govier Seeley, an Assistant Master at Dulwich College in 1885.

SHAW ROAD, SE22
Named in 1995 and commemorates Sir Eyre Massey Shaw (1830-1908), Irishman, army officer and first Chief Officer of the Metropolitan Fire Brigade (now the London Fire Brigade). He introduced modern firefighting methods and increased the number of stations.

SHAWBURY ROAD, SE22
Named in 1879 after Shawbury in Shropshire.

SILVESTER ROAD, SE22
Named in 1887 possibly after Silvestre, the French bibliographer who catalogued the library of Richard Heber, brother to Bishop Heber.

SOLWAY ROAD, SE22
Named in 1897 after the Solway Firth.

SOUTH CROXTED ROAD, SE21
The southern continuation (towards Gipsy Hill) of CROXTED ROAD.

SPENSER MEWS, SE21
Presumably named after the Elizabethan poet, Edmund Spenser.

SPINNEY GARDENS, SE19
One of four access roads on the site of Crystal Palace High Level Station. Derivations unknown. The others are Bowley Close, Bowley Lane and Burntwood View.

SPRINGHILL CLOSE, SE5
The first road south of the Fox on the Hill, leading into Champion Hill. The name is presumably explained by the hill being supplied with natural springs.

SPURLING ROAD, SE22
Named in 1878 to commemorate Henry John Spurling (1841-1898), a stockbroker who lived in de Crespigny Park. He served on Camberwell Vestry.

STEEN WAY, SE22
Named in 1967 after the 17th century Dutch artist, Jan Steen. One of the Dutch-derived names of developments on either side of East Dulwich Grove, named in honour of the 'friendship link' between the Metropolitan Borough of Camberwell and Deventer, in the Netherlands. The other roads in the development are Arnhem Way, Delft Way, Deventer Crescent, Hilversum Crescent, Isel Way, Kempis Way, Nimegen Way, Steen Way and Terborch Way.

STONEHILLS COURT, SE21
A development off College Road. Named in 1959 after a house called Stonehills which stood on the site.

STRADELLA ROAD, SE24
Named in 1894 after Alessandro Stradella (c.1645-1681), an Italian composer. Any connection between him and the Herne Hill area, where the road is to be found, is unclear.

STREAMLINE MEWS, SE22
Named after Streamline Motor Cycles which had premises nearby at 517-533 Lordship Lane (where Tool Station and Tile Giant are now).

SUNRAY AVENUE, SE24
The first entrance into Dulwich, travelling south from Denmark Hill, is Sunray Avenue, which leads into Red Post Hill at its southern end. The road is traversed halfway along by another road also called Sunray Avenue. Named in 1894. 

SYDCOTE, SE21
A development on the north-west corner of Thurlow Park Road and Rosendale Road named in 1963. The house of that name was formerly next to Glenlea in Thurlow Park Road (not to be confused with the former Glenlea on Dulwich Common). 

SYDENHAM RISE. SE23
Forms a triangle with Sydenham Hill and London Road, Forest Hill. 

SYDENHAM HILL, SE26 and SE23
Marks the longest section of the south-eastern boundary of the old Dulwich Manor and of the modern Dulwich Estate. Sydenham is an early placename and is to be found in a document of 1319 as 'Cypenham'.

TALBOT ROAD, SE22
Named in 1995 and one of several roads in East Dulwich commemorating bishops, in this case Edward Stuart Talbot (1844-1934), bishop of Southwark in 1905.

TARBERT ROAD, SE22
Named in 1879 for Tarbert in Scotland.

TELL GROVE, SE22
Named in 1879, possibly after the landowner.

TERBORCH WAY, SE22
Named in 1967 after a 17th century Dutch artist, Gerard Terborch (1617-81), who lived in Deventer. One of the Dutch-derived names of developments on either side of East Dulwich Grove, named in honour of the 'friendship link' between the Metropolitan Borough of Camberwell and Deventer, in the Netherlands. The other roads in the development are Arnhem Way, Delft Way, Deventer Crescent, Hilversum Crescent, Isel Way, Kempis Way, Nimegen Way and Steen Way.

THERAPIA ROAD, SE22
Named in 1878 and commemorates the Crimean War. The town of Tarabya in the Bosporus is a health resort and its name means ‘healing’ from the Latin ‘therapia’, hence ‘therapy’. Tarabya was a place of convalescence for wounded troops. It is one of the four local roads which commemorate the Crimean War, the others are Marmora, Mundania and Scutari Roads.

THE GARDENS, SE22
Named in 1868 for the market gardens that were on the site.

THOMPSON ROAD, SE22
Named in 1867 and commemorates John Thompson (1785-1866), his brother Charles Thompson (1791-1843) and his son Charles Thurston Thompson (1816-68). All three were skilled wood engravers.

THORNCOMBE ROAD, SE22
Constructed in 1879 on the line of an old footpath leading from East Dulwich Grove to Dulwich, via White Cottage. Probably named after a village in Dorset, but why is unclear.

THURLOW PARK ROAD, SE21
Named after Lord Thurlow, the 18th century Lord Chancellor who owned the Knights Hill Estate.

TINTAGEL CRESCENT, SE22
Named in 1898 after Tintagel in Cornwall.

TOLLGATE DRIVE, SE21
Named from the Toll Gate nearby in College Road, the only toll gate still in use in the London area.

TOWNLEY ROAD, SE22
Margaret Townley was Edward Alleyn's mother's maiden name. The road was named in 1884.

TROSSACHS ROAD, SE22
Named in 1879 after the Trossach mountains in Scotland.

TURNEY ROAD, SE21
George Turney was a vestryman of Camberwell Parish in 1863. The road was named officially in 1905 but is given that name on an 1876 map.

TYLNEY AVENUE, SE19
Named in 1960. Edmund Tylney was Master of the Queen's Revels under Elizabeth I in 1583, and there is therefore a tenuous link with Edward Alleyn.

TYRRELL ROAD, SE22
Named in 1868 after Sir James Tyrrell (1642-1718) who was educated at Camberwell Free School and was a writer on the history, laws and constitution of England. He was Deputy Lord Lieutenant and a JP for Buckinghamshire.

ULVERSCROFT ROAD, SE22
Named in 1867 after land on the Friern Manor Farm estate.

UNDERHILL ROAD, SE22
Named in 1866 and one of several roads in East Dulwich commemorating bishops, in this case John Underhill who was bishop of Oxford from 1589 until his death in 1592.

UPLAND ROAD, SE22
Named in 1867 after a local field name on the Friern Manor Farm estate.

VALE END, SE22
Named in 1938 after the adjoining Grove Vale.

VICTORIA CLOSE, SE22
Derivation unknown.

VILLAGE WAY, SE21
Linking Half Moon Lane with Dulwich Village and built through the grounds of Pond House when the railway line necessitated a detour in Half Moon Lane in the 1860s.

WALKERSCROFT MEAD, SE21
Almost certainly named after Robert Waldecart of Ludham, mentioned as the purchaser in 1315 of a freehold messuage and 9 acres in Dulwich (called Reygates). He must also have held two acres of copyhold, subsequently referred to almost invariably (allowing for spelling variations) as Walkerscroft. Evidence of its precise location is frustratingly absent, despite its frequent appearances in the old records, from 1428 (as Fulkart). In 1497 there is the significant spelling Walcardescrofte and, in 1568, Waulcardise Crofte. Walkerscroft Mead, the name given to part of the development in Croxted Road which includes Pymers Mead and Perifield, is accordingly tautologous.

WANLEY ROAD, SE5
Named in 1952 after clergyman and poet Nathaniel Wanley (1622-1680). Robert Browning's Pied Pieper of Hamelin is based on one of Wanley’s books. One of a group of roads on the Champion Hill Estate, named after friends or connections of the Camberwell-born poet Robert Browning (1812-1889), although oddly not including one named after Browning himself. The others are Arnould Avenue, Domett Close, Dowson Close and Moncler Close.

WARMINGTON ROAD, SE24
Off Half Moon Lane, at a right angle to Ruskin Walk. Probably named, in 1889, after a parish in Warwickshire.

WAVEL PLACE, SE26
Between Fountain Drive and Sydenham Hill. Derivation unclear.

WHATELEY ROAD, SE22
Named in 1886 and one of several roads in East Dulwich commemorating bishops, in this case Richard Whateley (1787-1863), an English academic, rhetorician, logician, philosopher, economist, and theologian. He was a leading Broad Churchman, a prolific and combative author over a wide range of topics, a flamboyant character, and one of the first to recognise the talents of Jane Austen. He was Archbishop of Dublin from 1831 until his death in 1863.

WICKERS OAKE, SE19
Off Dulwich Wood Park. The famous ancient tree called the Vicar's Oak may be sited, to within a few feet, to the centre of the roundabout at the southern end of Crystal Palace Parade. The coppice wood to which the tree (the meeting point of four parishes, namely Camberwell, Lambeth, Battersea and Streatham) gave its name is first mentioned in the Dulwich records, as a close called Wickers Oake Coppice, in 1607. From 1645 onwards there are recorded sales, every ten years or so, of the wood and underwood in Vicars (or Vickers) Oak (or Oake) Coppice, given as 32 acres in 1668, until at least 1798, although the Vicars Oak itself seems to have been cut down in 1678. In 1854 the new Crystal Palace Co. became occupier (and lessee, through its nominee George Wythes) of substantial parts of Vicars Oak Wood and Kings Wood. and the Crystal Palace Parade was constructed just within the eastern boundary of the old coppice wood.

WILKIE WAY.
Named in 1985 to commemorate Sir David Wilkie RA (1785-1841) a Scottish painter known for his genre scenes and friend of Dr Glennie. One of the access roads on the Lordship Lane estate at the junction of Dulwich Common and Lordship Lane named for friends of Dr William Glennie (1761-1828) whose 18th century school was nearby. The others are Barclay Way, Barker Way, Howard Way, Hunt Way and Moore Way.

WINTERBROOK ROAD, SE24
Named in 1896, apparently after a district of Wallingford, Berkshire (now Oxfordshire), but possibly because the watercourse that ran across it in former times dried up in Summer but flowed more freely in winter.

WOODFARRS, SE5
A variation of Woodsires. The corruption of the name originates in Blanch's misreading of the old-fashioned 's' for an 'f' in his 'Ye Parish of Camerwell' (1875), a book on which the local authority evidently placed great reliance in selecting old Dulwich names to be revived for modern developments.

WOODHALL AVENUE, SE21
A cul-de-sac off WOODHALL DRIVE (qv).

WOODHALL DRIVE, SE21
An extended crescent off College Road, which took its name (in the early 1960s) from the mansion Wood Hall (101 College Road), which in the 1870s had replaced one called Woodhouse, built by Thomas Lett c.1810, and later occupied by, amongst others, the historian George Grote, and James Eno of fruit salts fame.

WOODSYRE, SE26
A modern development off Sydenham Hill. As a placename, Woodsire (the more usual spelling) first appears, in a reference to ‘the lord's land at Wodeshere’, in 1335. William Wodeshere, probably named because he or his forebear had the job of tending the lord of the manor's woods, is, intriguingly, mentioned in the same Court Roll, as being fined for his animals damaging the lord's property at Wodeshere. Under Bermondsey Abbey and the Calton family, Woodsire (comprising 44 acres) remained part of the lord of the manor's demesne lands, essentially Dulwich Court Farm on either side of Court Lane. Woodsire became subdivided into a number of parcels: Woodsire Grove was 8 acres of mainly woodland on which Alleyn's School now stands; Great Woodsires was about 30 acres at one point, and Little Woodsires 14 acres, but another ten acres was carved out of Great Woodsires (leaving the latter at 20 acres) and added to an adjoining 3 acres to make another 13-acre parcel also, confusingly, called Little Woodsires. The 20 acres and the 13 acres were thereafter included as part of Dulwich Court Farm, and the 14 acres, straddling what is now East Dulwich Grove, was leased with a house which is now Lyndenhurst, but after 1719 the leases cease to refer to Little Woodsires by name.

WOODWARDE ROAD, SE22
Named in 1884 in honour of Edward Alleyn's first wife, Joan Woodward (died 1623).

WOODYARD LANE, SE21
Named from the use to which the yard at the end of the lane was put by the Dulwich Estates Governors, now the Estate Trustees.

Worlingham Road, SE22
Named in 1880, possibly from Worlingham in Suffolk.

ZENORIA STREET, SE22 
Named in 1882 after Zenoria, daughter of Major Sill who died in the American Civil War. Zenoria was buried with her grandfather Joseph Sill (-1779) in St Giles churchyard.